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Did'nt know what is 3G? - NOW YOU WILL KNOW!

3G is an ITU specification for the third generation (analog cellular was the first generation, digital PCS the second) of mobile communications technology. 3G promises increased bandwidth, up to 384 Kbps when a device is stationary or moving at pedestrian speed, 128 Kbps in a car, and 2 Mbps in fixed applications. 3G will work over wireless air interfaces such as GSM, TDMA, and CDMA. The new EDGE air interface has been developed specifically to meet the bandwidth needs of 3G.

3G is the generation of mobile phone standards and technology, after 2G. It is based on the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) family of standards under the International Mobile Telecommunications programme, "IMT-2000". 3G technologies enable network operators to offer users a wider range of more advanced services while achieving greater network capacity through improved spectral efficiency. Services include wide-area wireless voice telephony and broadband wireless data, all in a mobile environment. Typically, they provide service at 5-10 Mb per second.

Unlike IEEE 802.11 networks, 3G networks are wide area cellular telephone networks which evolved to incorporate high-speed internet access and video telephony. IEEE 802.11 (common home Wi-Fi) networks are short range, high-bandwidth networks primarily developed for data.

In December 2005, 100 3G networks were operating in 40 countries, according to the Global mobile Suppliers Association. In Asia, Europe, Canada and the USA, telecommunication companies use W-CDMA technology with the support of around 100 terminal designs to operate 3G mobile networks.

In Europe, 3G services were introduced starting in March 2003 in the UK and Italy. The European Union Council suggested that the 3G operators should cover 80% of the European national populations by the end of 2005.

Roll-out of 3G networks was delayed in some countries by the enormous costs of additional spectrum licensing fees. See Telecoms crash. In many countries, 3G networks do not use the same radio frequencies as 2G, so mobile operators must build entirely new networks and license entirely new frequencies; an exception is the United States where carriers operate 3G service in the same frequencies as other services. The license fees in some European countries were particularly high, bolstered by government auctions of a limited number of licenses and sealed bid auctions, and initial excitement over 3G's potential. Other delays were due to the expenses of upgrading equipment for the new systems.

By June 2007 the 200 millionth 3G subscriber had been connected. Out of 3 billion mobile phone subscriptions worldwide this is only 6.7%. In the countries where 3G was launched first - Japan and South Korea over half of all subscribers use 3G. In Europe the leading country is Italy with a third of its subscribers migrated to 3G. Other leading countries by 3G migration include UK, Austria and Singapore at the 20% migration level. A confusing statistic is counting CDMA 2000 1x RTT customers as if they were 3G customers. If using this oft-disputed definition, then the total 3G subscriber base would be 475 million at June 2007 and 15.8% of all subscribers worldwide.

EMTEL Ltd, the second largest mobile telecommunications company in Mauritius (next to state owned Cellplus), has established the first commercial Universal Mobile Telecommunications Standard (UMTS) 3G network in Africa (the first test call was made on 16 October 2004). Full commercial services began in November 2004, making this the first commercial African 3G network. In north African Morocco in late March 2006, a 3G service was provided by the new company Wana. The other operator in the country should start its network in mid-2007. Vodafone Egypt (also known as CLICK GSM) was to provide the service in Egypt in mid-2006. In early 2007, Vodacom Tanzania switched on its 3G High-Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) in Dar Es Salaam. It is the second country in Africa with such technology, after South Africa. In March 2007, Nigeria awarded 3G telecommunication licenses to its three major GSM companies and a relatively unknown operator, Alheri Engineering Co. Ltd, to allow them to expand their scope of operation in the industry.

 Want to know more? Visit : 3G at Wikipedia

 

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